Recommendation from Laura Megivern, Board of Directors, IMPACT Conference

“Michelle completed a full website redesign for us at the IMPACT Conference. She was great to work with – flexible, prompt, and really took the time to understand our unique needs, organizational history, and capacity in order to find sustainable solutions for us. I highly recommend Michelle for organizations looking for marketing and design work!”

Laura Megivern

President, Board of Directors

IMPACT Conference

Learn more about my marketing / digital / social media clients.

Recommendation from Laura Megivern

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Using Google Analytics to inform a non-profit website redesign

Using Google Analytics to inform a non-profit website redesign

A non-profit website redesign is an exciting prospect, presenting an organization the opportunity to modernize options, rethink user needs, and update, well, everything, from text to images to site architecture. But a new website should lean heavily on one major component of the old website and that’s analytics. If you have Google Analytics (GA) installed on your current website, it’s likely a treasure trove of information which should inform your redesign.

Here are the ways you should use Google Analytics to inform your non-profit website redesign:

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Notes from 100 Coffee Shops in 7 Months

Notes from 100 Coffee Shops in 7 Months

When I embarked on a road trip across the US, I wanted to see new cities and states, national and state parks, old friends, and new views. As the wheels kept turning, it became obvious that my real purpose was to take a coffee tour across the country. Of course, I knew I was addicted (ahem, passionate) about lattes, pastries, and coffee shop life before embarking on my travels, but the way I enjoyed coffee shops at home had almost become second nature – they had become my “third place” each weekend and even many mornings and evenings.

On the road, my enthusiasm for coffee (and coffee shops) became vital once I could no longer rely on the routines of home. Soon I found myself visiting one or two, sometimes three, new coffee shops in a day. Coffee shops became the places I had breakfast, picked up local newspapers, overheard local chatter and accents, got my caffeine fix, and continued to work for my marketing clients.

On August 30th, I rolled into Eugene, Oregon and visited my 100th coffee shop on this, so far, seven month road trip across the United States. Tailored Coffee Roasters was a great landing spot for my 100th and I enjoyed a small iced caramel latte, a slice of really great avocado toast, and good conversation with the barista.

Here’s a best-of recap of the 100 coffee shops I’ve visited in the previous seven months.

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The most romantic Crater Lake National Park

The most romantic Crater Lake National Park

If you want a romantic getaway in a stunning setting, Crater Lake National Park would be my suggestion. Even though I was camping in the park this month, I decided to treat myself to a little bit of luxury and Crater Lake certainly offers the best of it.

Crater Lake National Park is in southern Oregon, in the Cascade Mountains. Its namesake isn’t actually a crater, rather it’s a caldera. A caldera is the depression left by a collapsed volcano and Crater Lake’s Mount Mazama is thought to have lost 2,500 to 3,500 feet in height around 5700 BC. In the following 700 years, the lake slowly filled in with fresh rainwater and snowmelt.

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A good walk amongst tall trees: Redwood National Park

A good walk amongst tall trees: Redwood National Park

Redwood National Park has been on my bucket list for quite some time. I used to see photos of the tall, majestic redwoods and something in my soul would stir. I’ve always wanted to travel out west to see them and I finally had the chance this August.

Redwood National Park is home to some of the tallest trees on earth, but it is also one of the most diverse national parks I have visited. In addition to the redwoods, there are prairies, oak woodlands, rivers, and nearly 40 miles of beautiful coastline.

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How to Build a Non-Profit Blog Editorial Calendar

How to Build a Non-Profit Blog Editorial Calendar

A blog is a great tool for non-profits. It gives you control over your own news channel essentially.

Without a blog, you can put out press releases and photos all day long, but if the news outlets don’t pick it up, it feels like the news never happened. If you have your own blog, you can post the press release there, along with photos, links, and more materials, then share all of that on social media, on your website, and in an e-newsletter. But if you’re thinking of starting a blog and don’t have a lot of content, you may wonder how to get started.

A blog editorial calendar will help you with timing, messaging, and management. Here’s how to build one:

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Give button: Add one more to your non-profit website

Give button: Add one more to your non-profit website

If you’re a non-profit webmaster, you probably look at your website all the time. After awhile, your eyes may begin to gloss over the details, including your Give button. For example, at a statewide non-profit, we had a Give tab in the main navigation of the website and a Give link in the footer of the page. I decided to review every page of text and include a PBS-style request for donations within the content of each page. For example, “This program is support by donors like you…Please make a gift today.”

But my eyes eventually landed on a strip of white space on the left side of our page templates. It included secondary navigation links, but seemed really underutilized. I wondered what would happen if I put a second Give button (and a third or fourth option to give, depending on the page) in that space.

Here’s what happened:

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